Interesting Facts About TIMBER RATTLESNAKE in the Wild

Interesting Facts About TIMBER RATTLESNAKE in the Wild

The timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) can be found in the eastern United States. It is the heaviest and largest venomous snake in the country with some specimens exceeding 1.5 m (5 ft) in length. The timber rattlesnake is a subspecies of the western rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis) which includes many other venomous snakes found throughout North and South America.

The name “rattlesnake” comes from the noise made when the snake vibrates its tail which it does when it feels threatened. The timber rattlesnake is a Pit viper meaning it has heat-sensing pits located between its eyes and nostrils. These pits help the snake locate prey and strike with great accuracy even in complete darkness. The venom of the timber rattlesnake is particularly potent and can cause serious injury or death if not treated immediately.

timber rattlesnake range

Timber rattlesnake range

The timber rattlesnake is a large venomous snake found in the eastern United States. The snake is characterized by a triangular head black or brown body with white crossbands and a rattle at the end of its tail. The average length of an adult timber rattlesnake is 3-5 feet with the record being just over 6 feet.

The timber rattlesnake is found in forested areas from Maine to Georgia and as far west as Missouri and Oklahoma. The snake is most commonly found in deciduous forests but can also be found in rocky areas and swamps.

timber rattlesnake bite

Timber rattlesnake bite

The Timber Rattlesnake is a venomous snake that is found in the eastern half of the United States. These snakes usually grow to be about 3-5 feet in length and their bite can be fatal to humans if not treated immediately. If you are bitten by a Timber Rattlesnake it is important to seek medical attention immediately and to avoid moving the affected limb as this can spread the venom more quickly throughout your body.

timber rattlesnake texas

Timber rattlesnake texas

The timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) also known as the canebrake rattlesnake or banded rattlesnake is a venomous pit viper species native to the eastern United States. It is the heaviest and one of the longest venomous snakes in North America. Adults usually grow to a length of 3–5 ft (91–152 cm) but can occasionally exceed 6 ft (183 cm). The timber rattlesnake is found in deciduous forested areas from central Arkansas northeast to southern Maine and southwest to northern Mississippi. Isolated populations are also found in western Arkansas southeastern Missouri and extreme southern Illinois.

timber rattlesnake habitat

Timber rattlesnake habitat

The timber rattlesnake is a large venomous snake found in the eastern United States. It is typically brown or gray in color with a diamond-shaped pattern on its back. The timber rattlesnake is found in forests and swamps and often hides in rocks or hollow trees. It is a shy snake that usually only bites humans if it feels threatened. If you see a timber rattlesnake it is best to leave it alone!

timber rattlesnake venom

Timber rattlesnake venom

The venom of a timber rattlesnake is highly toxic and can cause serious injury or death in humans if not treated promptly. The venom is a hemotoxin which means that it attacks the blood cells and prevents the clotting of blood. This can lead to internal bleeding organ damage and even death. If you are bitten by a timber rattlesnake it is important to seek medical attention immediately and to avoid movement as this will spread the venom more quickly through your body.

Timber rattlesnake size

The timber rattlesnake is one of the largest venomous snakes in North America with some adults exceeding 80 inches (2 m) in length. The average size is between 48 and 60 inches (1.2 and 1.5 m). Females are typically larger than males and Western populations tend to be larger than those in the East.

TIMBER RATTLESNAKE reproduction and development

TIMBER RATTLESNAKE reproduction and development

Reproduction and development in Timber Rattlesnakes are pretty similar to other snakes. They reach sexual maturity at 3-6 years old and will mate every 2-3 years. Females will give birth to 10-20 live young (rarely more) in the late summer or early fall. The young are born with venom and are capable of fanging and biting from birth but they are not very big (about 10 inches long). They will grow quickly though and can reach lengths of up to 5 feet within 2 years.

TIMBER RATTLESNAKE

TIMBER RATTLESNAKE lifespan

It is one of the most dangerous snakes in North America and has a lifespan of up to 25 years in the wild. The Timber Rattlesnake is a shy and reclusive snake and will only attack humans if it feels threatened. If you encounter a Timber Rattlesnake it is important to stay calm and avoid making any sudden movements. If you are bitten by a Timber Rattlesnake you should seek medical attention immediately as their venom can be deadly.

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